impassionate

[ im-pash-uh-nit ]
/ ɪmˈpæʃ ə nɪt /
|

adjective

filled with passion; impassioned.

Origin of impassionate

First recorded in 1595–1605; impassion + -ate1
Related formsim·pas·sion·ate·ly, adverbun·im·pas·sion·ate, adjectiveun·im·pas·sion·ate·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for impassionate

  • But when angered, her impassionate nature manifests itself in its ugliest form.

    Woman and Socialism|August Bebel
  • I will leave it to the calm, impassionate and unpartisan reader to state whether that remark ought to create ill-feeling.

    Remarks|Bill Nye
  • Of all characters, perhaps that of the loving, impassionate Star of the North suited her best.

    A Mad Love|Bertha M. Clay
  • She took up postures of prayer and rapture, with staring eyes, and spoke with impassionate and glowing rhetoric.

Word Origin and History for impassionate

impassionate


adj.

"free from passion," 1620s, from in- (1) "not" + passionate. Related: Impassionately.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper