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inanimate

[ in-an-uh-mit ]
/ ɪnˈæn ə mɪt /
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adjective
not animate; lifeless.
spiritless; sluggish; dull.
Linguistics. belonging to a syntactic category or having a semantic feature that is characteristic of words denoting objects, concepts, and beings regarded as lacking perception and volition (opposed to animate).
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Origin of inanimate

From the Late Latin word inanimātus, dating back to 1555–65. See in-3, animate

OTHER WORDS FROM inanimate

in·an·i·mate·ly, adverbin·an·i·mate·ness, in·an·i·ma·tion [in-an-uh-mey-shuhn], /ɪnˌæn əˈmeɪ ʃən/, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use inanimate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for inanimate

inanimate
/ (ɪnˈænɪmɪt) /

adjective
lacking the qualities or features of living beings; not animateinanimate objects
lacking any sign of life or consciousness; appearing dead
lacking vitality; spiritless; dull

Derived forms of inanimate

inanimately, adverbinanimateness or inanimation (ɪnˌænɪˈmeɪʃən), noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for inanimate

inanimate
[ ĭn-ănə-mĭt ]

adj.
Not having the qualities associated with active, living organisms; not animate.

Other words from inanimate

in•ani•mate•ness n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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