incantation

[ in-kan-tey-shuhn ]
/ ˌɪn kænˈteɪ ʃən /

noun

the chanting or uttering of words purporting to have magical power.
the formula employed; a spell or charm.
magical ceremonies.
magic; sorcery.
repetitious wordiness used to conceal a lack of content; obfuscation: Her prose too often resorts to incantation.

Origin of incantation

1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin incantātiōn- (stem of incantātiō), equivalent to incantāt(us) past participle of incantāre to put a spell on, bewitch (see enchant, -ate1) + -iōn- -ion

SYNONYMS FOR incantation

Related forms

in·can·ta·tion·al, in·can·ta·to·ry [in-kan-tuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ɪnˈkæn təˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/, adjectivein·can·ta·tor, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for incantatory

  • He conducts this ceremony with the greatest solemnity, occasionally pronouncing these incantatory words, "Plate or shell, sah?"

    Physiology of The Opera|John H. Swaby (AKA "Scrici")
  • I then perceived for the first time in my life the mysterious, incantatory, supernatural powers of great eloquence.

    The Wrack of the Storm|Maurice Maeterlinck

British Dictionary definitions for incantatory (1 of 2)

incantatory

/ (ɪnˈkæntətrɪ) /

adjective

relating to or having the characteristics of an incantation

British Dictionary definitions for incantatory (2 of 2)

incantation

/ (ˌɪnkænˈteɪʃən) /

noun

ritual recitation of magic words or sounds
the formulaic words or sounds used; a magic spell

Derived Forms

incantational, adjective

Word Origin for incantation

C14: from Late Latin incantātiō an enchanting, from incantāre to repeat magic formulas, from Latin, from in- ² + cantāre to sing; see enchant
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012