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inchoate

[ in-koh-it, -eyt or, especially British, in-koh-eyt ]
/ ɪnˈkoʊ ɪt, -eɪt or, especially British, ˈɪn koʊˌeɪt /
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adjective
not yet completed or fully developed; rudimentary.
just begun; incipient.
not organized; lacking order: an inchoate mass of ideas on the subject.
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Origin of inchoate

1525–35; <Latin inchoātus, variant of incohātus, past participle of incohāre “to begin, start work on,” perhaps equivalent to in- in-2 + coh(um) “hollow of a yoke into which the pole is fitted” + -ātus -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM inchoate

in·cho·ate·ly, adverbin·cho·ate·ness, noun

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH inchoate

inchoate , innate
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use inchoate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for inchoate

inchoate

adjective (ɪnˈkəʊeɪt, -ˈkəʊɪt)
just beginning; incipient
undeveloped; immature; rudimentary
(of a legal document, promissory note, etc) in an uncompleted state; not yet made specific or valid
verb (ɪnˈkəʊeɪt) (tr)
to begin

Derived forms of inchoate

inchoately, adverbinchoateness, nouninchoation, nouninchoative (ɪnˈkəʊətɪv), adjective

Word Origin for inchoate

C16: from Latin incohāre to make a beginning, literally: to hitch up, from in- ² + cohum yokestrap
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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