inculcate

[ in-kuhl-keyt, in-kuhl-keyt ]
/ ɪnˈkʌl keɪt, ˈɪn kʌlˌkeɪt /

verb (used with object), in·cul·cat·ed, in·cul·cat·ing.

to implant by repeated statement or admonition; teach persistently and earnestly (usually followed by upon or in): to inculcate virtue in the young.
to cause or influence (someone) to accept an idea or feeling (usually followed by with): Socrates inculcated his pupils with the love of truth.

Nearby words

  1. incudal,
  2. incudectomy,
  3. incudes,
  4. incudomalleal,
  5. incudostapedial,
  6. inculcation,
  7. inculpable,
  8. inculpate,
  9. inculpation,
  10. inculpatory

Origin of inculcate

1540–50; < Latin inculcātus past participle of inculcāre to trample, impress, stuff in, equivalent to in- in-2 + culc- (variant, in noninitial position, of calc-, stem of calx heel) + -ātus -ate1

Related formsin·cul·ca·tion, nounin·cul·ca·tive [in-kuhl-kuh-tiv] /ɪnˈkʌl kə tɪv/, in·cul·ca·to·ry, adjectivein·cul·ca·tor, noun

Can be confusedinculcate indoctrinate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for inculcate


British Dictionary definitions for inculcate

inculcate

/ (ˈɪnkʌlˌkeɪt, ɪnˈkʌlkeɪt) /

verb

(tr) to instil by forceful or insistent repetition
Derived Formsinculcation, nouninculcator, noun

Word Origin for inculcate

C16: from Latin inculcāre to tread upon, ram down, from in- ² + calcāre to trample, from calx heel

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012