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indiction

[in-dik-shuh n]
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noun
  1. a proclamation made every 15 years in the later Roman Empire, fixing the valuation of property to be used as a basis for taxation.
  2. a tax based on such valuation.
  3. Also called cycle of indiction. the recurring fiscal period of 15 years in the Roman Empire, long used for dating ordinary events.Compare lustrum.
  4. a specified year in this period.
  5. the number indicating it.
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Origin of indiction

1350–1400; Middle English indiccio(u)n < Latin indictiōn- (stem of indictiō) announcement, equivalent to indict(us) past participle of indīcere to announce, proclaim + -iōn- -ion
Related formsin·dic·tion·al, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for indiction

Historical Examples

  • Indeed, if popularity was an indiction, this had become suddenly true.

    A Sappho of Green Springs

    Bret Harte

  • Given at Rome, the 6th of the Ides of January, the 14th indiction.

  • The date of the letters is the Third Indiction, September 1, 509.

    The Letters of Cassiodorus

    Cassiodorus (AKA Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus Senator)

  • The general tribute, or indiction, as it was called, was derived largely from the taxation of landed property.

    The World's Greatest Books, Vol XI.

    Edited by Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton

  • Cycles used in chronology are three: The solar cycle, the lunar cycle, and the cycle of indiction.

    Our Calendar

    George Nichols Packer


British Dictionary definitions for indiction

indiction

noun (in the Roman Empire and later in various medieval kingdoms)
  1. a recurring fiscal period of 15 years, often used as a unit for dating events
  2. a particular year in this period or the number assigned it
  3. (from the reign of Constantine the Great)
    1. a valuation of property made every 15 years as a basis for taxation
    2. the tax based on this valuation
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Derived Formsindictional, adjective

Word Origin

C14: from Latin indictiō declaration, announcement of a tax; see indite
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for indiction

n.

late 14c., "period of fifteen years," a chronological unit of the Romans, originally for taxation purposes, fixed by Constantine and reckoned from Sept. 1, 312; it was still in use in the Middle Ages. From Latin indictionem (nominative indictio) "declaration, appointment," noun of action from past participle stem of indicere (see indictive).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper