inherit

[ in-her-it ]
/ ɪnˈhɛr ɪt /
|

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

Origin of inherit

1275–1325; Middle English en(h)erit(i)en < Middle French enheriter < Late Latin inhērēditāre to make heir. See in-3, hereditary
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for inheriting

British Dictionary definitions for inheriting

inherit

/ (ɪnˈhɛrɪt) /

verb -its, -iting or -ited

to receive (property, a right, title, etc) by succession or under a will
(intr) to succeed as heir
(tr) to possess (a characteristic) through genetic transmission
(tr) to receive (a position, attitude, property, etc) from a predecessor
Derived Formsinherited, adjectiveinheritor, nouninheritress or inheritrix, fem n

Word Origin for inherit

C14: from Old French enheriter, from Late Latin inhērēditāre to appoint an heir, from Latin hērēs heir
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for inheriting

inherit


v.

c.1300, "to make (someone) an heir," from Old French enheriter "make heir, appoint as heir," from Late Latin inhereditare "to appoint as heir," from Latin in- "in" (see in- (2)) + hereditare "to inherit," from heres (genitive heredis) "heir" (see heredity). Sense of "receive inheritance" arose mid-14c.; original sense is retained in disinherit. Related: Inherited; inheriting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for inheriting

inherit

[ ĭn-hĕrĭt ]

v.

To receive a trait from one's parents by genetic transmission.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.