insert

[ verb in-surt; noun in-surt ]
/ verb ɪnˈsɜrt; noun ˈɪn sɜrt /

verb (used with object)

to put or place in: to insert a key in a lock.
to introduce or cause to be introduced into the body of something: to insert an extra paragraph in an article.

noun

QUIZZES

THINK YOU’VE GOT A HANDLE ON THIS US STATE NICKNAME QUIZ?

Did you ever collect all those state quarters? Put them to good use on this quiz about curious state monikers and the facts around them.
Question 1 of 8
Mississippi’s nickname comes from the magnificent trees that grow there. What is it?

Origin of insert

First recorded in 1520–30; from Latin insertus, past participle of inserere “to put in, insert,” equivalent to in- “in” + ser- (stem of serere “to link together”) + -tus past participle suffix; see in-2

OTHER WORDS FROM insert

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for insert

British Dictionary definitions for insert

insert

verb (ɪnˈsɜːt) (tr)

to put in or between; introduce
to introduce, as into text, such as a newspaper; interpolate

noun (ˈɪnsɜːt)

something inserted
  1. a folded section placed in another for binding in with a book
  2. a printed sheet, esp one bearing advertising, placed loose between the leaves of a book, periodical, etc
another word for cut in (def. 6)

Derived forms of insert

insertable, adjectiveinserter, noun

Word Origin for insert

C16: from Latin inserere to plant in, ingraft, from in- ² + serere to join
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012