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instep

[ in-step ]
/ ˈɪnˌstɛp /
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noun
the arched upper surface of the human foot between the toes and the ankle.
the part of a shoe, stocking, etc., covering this surface.
the front of the hind leg of a horse, cow, etc., between the hock and the pastern joint; cannon.
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Origin of instep

1520–30; apparently in-1 + step
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use instep in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for instep

instep
/ (ˈɪnˌstɛp) /

noun
the middle section of the human foot, forming the arch between the ankle and toes
the part of a shoe, stocking, etc, covering this

Word Origin for instep

C16: probably from in- ² + step
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for instep

instep
[ ĭnstĕp′ ]

n.
The arched middle part of the foot between toes and ankle.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Other Idioms and Phrases with instep

in step

1

Moving to a rhythm or conforming to the movements of others, as in The kids marched in step to the music. [Late 1800s]

2

in step with. In conformity or harmony with, as in He was in step with the times. The antonym to both usages is out of step, as in They're out of step with the music, or His views are out of step with the board's. [Late 1800s] Also see in phase; out of phase.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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