institution

[ in-sti-too-shuh n, -tyoo- ]
/ ˌɪn stɪˈtu ʃən, -ˈtyu- /

noun

Origin of institution

1350–1400; Middle English < Latin institūtiōn- (stem of institūtiō). See institute, -ion
Related formscoun·ter·in·sti·tu·tion, nounnon·in·sti·tu·tion, nounre·in·sti·tu·tion, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for institution

British Dictionary definitions for institution

institution

/ (ˌɪnstɪˈtjuːʃən) /

noun

Derived Formsinstitutionary, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for institution

institution


n.

c.1400, "action of establishing or founding (a system of government, a religious order, etc.)," from Old French institucion "foundation; thing established," from Latin institutionem (nominative institutio) "disposition, arrangement; instruction, education," noun of state from institutus (see institute). Meaning "established law or practice" is from 1550s. Meaning "establishment or organization for the promotion of some charity" is from 1707.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper