intensive

[ in-ten-siv ]
/ ɪnˈtɛn sɪv /

adjective

noun

something that intensifies.
Grammar. an intensive element or formation, as -self in himself, or Latin -tō in iac-tō, “I hurl” from iacō, “I throw.”

Origin of intensive

First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English word from Medieval Latin word intēnsīvus. See intense, -ive
Related formsin·ten·sive·ly, adverbin·ten·sive·ness, nounun·in·ten·sive, adjectiveun·in·ten·sive·ly, adverb
Can be confusedintense intensive intents
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for intensively

British Dictionary definitions for intensively

intensive

/ (ɪnˈtɛnsɪv) /

adjective

noun

an intensifier or intensive pronoun or grammatical construction
Derived Formsintensively, adverbintensiveness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for intensively

intensive


adj.

mid-15c., from French intensif (14c.), from Latin intens-, past participle stem of intendere (see intend). As a noun, 1813, from the adjective. Alternative intensitive is a malformation. Intensive care attested from 1958. Related: Intensively.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper