intention

[ in-ten-shuhn ]
/ ɪnˈtɛn ʃən /

noun

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Origin of intention

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English intencio(u)n, from Latin intentiōn- (stem of intentiō ). See intent2, -ion

synonym study for intention

2. Intention, intent, purpose all refer to a wish that one means to carry out. Intention is the general word: His intention is good. Intent is chiefly legal or literary: attack with intent to kill. Purpose implies having a goal or determination to achieve something: Her strong sense of purpose is reflected in her studies.

OTHER WORDS FROM intention

in·ten·tion·less, adjectivemis·in·ten·tion, nounpre·in·ten·tion, nounsub·in·ten·tion, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for intention

British Dictionary definitions for intention

intention
/ (ɪnˈtɛnʃən) /

noun

a purpose or goal; aimit is his intention to reform
law the resolve or design with which a person does or refrains from doing an act, a necessary ingredient of certain offences
med a natural healing process, as by first intention, in which the edges of a wound cling together with no tissue between, or by second intention, in which the wound edges adhere with granulation tissue
(usually plural) design or purpose with respect to a proposal of marriage (esp in the phrase honourable intentions)
an archaic word for meaning, intentness
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for intention

intention
[ ĭn-tĕnshən ]

n.

An aim that guides action.
The process by which or the manner in which a wound heals.

Other words from intention

in•tention•al adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.