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interject

[ in-ter-jekt ]
/ ˌɪn tərˈdʒɛkt /
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verb (used with object)

to insert between other things: to interject a clarification of a previous statement.
Obsolete. to come between.

QUIZZES

QUIZ YOURSELF ON “THEIR,” “THERE,” AND “THEY’RE”

Are you aware how often people swap around “their,” “there,” and “they’re”? Prove you have more than a fair grasp over these commonly confused words.
Question 1 of 7
Which one of these commonly confused words can act as an adverb or a pronoun?

Origin of interject

First recorded in 1570–80; from Latin interjectus, past participle of interjicere “to throw between,” equivalent to inter- “between, among, together” + -jec- (combining form of jac-, stem of jacere “to throw”) + -tus past participle suffix; see inter-

OTHER WORDS FROM interject

in·ter·jec·tor, nounun·in·ter·ject·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for interject

British Dictionary definitions for interject

interject
/ (ˌɪntəˈdʒɛkt) /

verb (tr)

to interpose abruptly or sharply; interrupt with; throw inshe interjected clever remarks
archaic to come between; interpose

Derived forms of interject

interjector, noun

Word Origin for interject

C16: from Latin interjicere to place between, from jacere to throw
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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