interlude

[ in-ter-lood ]
/ ˈɪn tərˌlud /

noun

an intervening episode, period, space, etc.
a short dramatic piece, especially of a light or farcical character, formerly introduced between the parts or acts of miracle and morality plays or given as part of other entertainments.
one of the early English farces or comedies, as those written by John Heywood, which grew out of such pieces.
any intermediate performance or entertainment, as between the acts of a play.
an instrumental passage or a piece of music rendered between the parts of a song, church service, drama, etc.

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Origin of interlude

1275–1325; Middle English <Medieval Latin interlūdium, equivalent to Latin inter-inter- + lūd(us) play + -ium-ium

OTHER WORDS FROM interlude

in·ter·lu·di·al, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for interlude

British Dictionary definitions for interlude

interlude
/ (ˈɪntəˌluːd) /

noun

a period of time or different activity between longer periods, processes, or events; episode or interval
theatre a short dramatic piece played separately or as part of a longer entertainment, common in 16th-century England
a brief piece of music, dance, etc, given between the sections of another performance

Word Origin for interlude

C14: from Medieval Latin interlūdium, from Latin inter- + lūdus play
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012