intermit

[ in-ter-mit ]
/ ˌɪn tərˈmɪt /

verb (used with object), in·ter·mit·ted, in·ter·mit·ting.

to discontinue temporarily; suspend.

verb (used without object), in·ter·mit·ted, in·ter·mit·ting.

to stop or pause at intervals; be intermittent.
to cease, stop, or break off operations for a time.

Nearby words

  1. intermigration,
  2. interminable,
  3. intermingle,
  4. intermission,
  5. intermissive,
  6. intermittence,
  7. intermittent,
  8. intermittent acute porphyria,
  9. intermittent claudication,
  10. intermittent cramp

Origin of intermit

1535–45; < Latin intermittere to leave a space between, drop (for a while), leave off, equivalent to inter- inter- + mittere to send, let go

Related formsin·ter·mit·ter, in·ter·mit·tor, nounin·ter·mit·ting·ly, adverbun·in·ter·mit·ted, adjectiveun·in·ter·mit·ting, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for intermit


British Dictionary definitions for intermit

intermit

/ (ˌɪntəˈmɪt) /

verb -mits, -mitting or -mitted

to suspend (activity) or (of activity) to be suspended temporarily or at intervals
Derived Formsintermittingly, adverbintermittor, noun

Word Origin for intermit

C16: from Latin intermittere to leave off, from inter- + mittere to send

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for intermit

intermit

v.

1540s, from Latin intermittere "to leave off, omit, suspend, interrupt, neglect," from inter- "between" (see inter-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Related: Intermitted; intermitting; intermittingly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper