Advertisement

Advertisement

internalization

[ in-tur-nl-ahy-zey-shuhn ]

noun

  1. the act or process of incorporating within oneself the values, knowledge, motives, etc., of others:

    We hope these new assessments will better measure students' internalization of concepts.

  2. the act or process of turning emotions or feelings inward or toward oneself:

    The novel is about the internalization of grief and how it can affect previously secure relationships.



Discover More

Word History and Origins

Discover More

Example Sentences

They may be internalizing the stress of the pandemic, the election and, now, violent mobs breaking into a place that’s sacred to our country.

As a result, many have internalized the idea that consuming food after a specific hour leads to weight gain and ill health.

When you don’t spend time with people, it makes you spend more time internalizing than you would if surrounded by people, and have more positive distraction.

From Digiday

Verbalizing values appears to be an essential part of the way that companies process and internalize change.

From Fortune

Recognizing and internalizing this new ransomware threat, and its potential potency, is a critical first step.

From Fortune

Was our internalization of the experience as arrogant as his?

Advertisement

Word of the Day

axolotl

[ak-suh-lot-l ]

Meaning and examples

Start each day with the Word of the Day in your inbox!

By clicking "Sign Up", you are accepting Dictionary.com Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policies.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


internal iliac arteryinternalize