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inveterate

[ in-vet-er-it ]
/ ɪnˈvɛt ər ɪt /
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adjective
settled or confirmed in a habit, practice, feeling, or the like: an inveterate gambler.
firmly established by long continuance, as a disease, habit, practice, feeling, etc.; chronic.
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Origin of inveterate

First recorded in 1375–1425; late Middle English, from Latin inveterātus (past participle of inveterāre “to grow old, allow to grow old, preserve”), equivalent to in- in-2 + veter- (stem of vetus “old”) + -ātus -ate1; cf. veteran

OTHER WORDS FROM inveterate

in·vet·er·ate·ly, adverbin·vet·er·ate·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use inveterate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for inveterate

inveterate
/ (ɪnˈvɛtərɪt) /

adjective
long established, esp so as to be deep-rooted or ingrainedan inveterate feeling of hostility
(prenominal) settled or confirmed in a habit or practice, esp a bad one; hardenedan inveterate smoker
obsolete full of hatred; hostile

Derived forms of inveterate

inveteracy or inveterateness, nouninveterately, adverb

Word Origin for inveterate

C16: from Latin inveterātus of long standing, from inveterāre to make old, from in- ² + vetus old
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for inveterate

inveterate
[ ĭn-vĕtər-ĭt ]

adj.
Firmly and long established; deep-rooted.
Persisting in an ingrained habit; habitual.

Other words from inveterate

in•veter•a•cy (-ər-ə-sē) n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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