Dictionary.com

ironically

[ ahy-ron-ik-lee ]
/ aɪˈrɒn ɪk li /
Save This Word!

adverb
in a way that uses words to mean the opposite of what they normally mean, or makes an obvious exaggeration or understatement, as a joke or in order to make a point:French author Voltaire ironically commented on war, “It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets.”
in a way that is the opposite of what would be expected, often as a remarkable coincidence:Ironically, one of the main messages of this text on warfare is how to avoid battle through meticulous preparation and planning.
QUIZ
WILL YOU SAIL OR STUMBLE ON THESE GRAMMAR QUESTIONS?
Smoothly step over to these common grammar mistakes that trip many people up. Good luck!
Question 1 of 7
Fill in the blank: I can’t figure out _____ gave me this gift.

Origin of ironically

First recorded in 1530–40; ironical + -ly

OTHER WORDS FROM ironically

non·i·ron·i·cal·ly, adverbsem·i-i·ron·i·cal·ly, adverbun·i·ron·i·cal·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use ironically in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for ironically

ironically
/ (aɪˈrɒnɪkəlɪ) /

adverb
(sentence modifier) it is ironic thatironically, McCoist has never scored against Rangers
in an ironic mannerI laughed ironically
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK