iterate

[ it-uh-reyt ]
/ ˈɪt əˌreɪt /

verb (used with object), it·er·at·ed, it·er·at·ing.

to do (something) over again or repeatedly.
to utter again or repeatedly.
to develop (a product, process, or idea) by building upon previous versions or iterations, using each version as the point of departure for refinements and tweaks: The manufacturer will iterate production and distribution schedules based on consumer demand.We iterate the app after each round of customer feedback.

verb (used without object), it·er·at·ed, it·er·at·ing.

to operate or be applied repeatedly, as a linguistic rule or mathematical formula.
to create something by building on previous versions or iterations, using each version as the point of departure for refinements and tweaks: The game studio is iterating on all current animation sets to incorporate the popular new characters.

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Origin of iterate

First recorded in 1525–35; <Latin iterātus, past participle of iterāre “to repeat, rehearse,” equivalent to iter- (stem of iterum “again”) + -ātus -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM iterate

un·it·er·at·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for iterate

British Dictionary definitions for iterate

iterate
/ (ˈɪtəˌreɪt) /

verb

(tr) to say or do again; repeat

Derived forms of iterate

iterant, adjectiveiteration or iterance, noun

Word Origin for iterate

C16: from Latin iterāre, from iterum again
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012