jarrah

[jar-uh]

Origin of jarrah

First recorded in 1865–70, jarrah is from the Nyungar word jaril
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for jarrah

Contemporary Examples of jarrah

Historical Examples of jarrah

  • Fig. 94 is a section of flooring which is generally made of hardwood, such as maple, oak, or jarrah.

    Woodwork Joints

    William Fairham

  • Jarrah, an Australian wood, is now very generally used for street-paving, and for this purpose it has no superior.

    Commercial Geography

    Jacques W. Redway

  • The specialty of the jarrah is its power to defy the ravages of the insect world and of the sea.

    Australian Pictures

    Howard Willoughby

  • Jarrah is, without doubt, the principal forest-tree of Western Australia.

    Spinifex and Sand

    David W Carnegie

  • This tree does not occur in such numbers as the Jarrah, its field of growth being limited.

    Spinifex and Sand

    David W Carnegie


British Dictionary definitions for jarrah

jarrah

noun
  1. a widely planted Australian eucalyptus tree, Eucalyptus marginata, that yields a valuable timber

Word Origin for jarrah

from a native Australian language
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012