jongleur

[ jong-gler; French zhawn-glœr ]
/ ˈdʒɒŋ glər; French ʒɔ̃ˈglœr /

noun, plural jon·gleurs [jong-glerz; French zhawn-glœr] /ˈdʒɒŋ glərz; French ʒɔ̃ˈglœr/.

(in medieval France and Norman England) an itinerant minstrel or entertainer who sang songs, often of his own composition, and told stories.

QUIZZES

How Hip Is Your Lingo? Take Our Slang Quiz!
If you aren’t already skilled in slang, then this quiz can get you up to speed in no time!
Question 1 of 11
OK Boomer can be perceived as pejorative, but it is mostly considered to be _____
Compare goliard.

Origin of jongleur

1755–65; < French; Middle French jougleur (perhaps by misreading, ou being read on), Old French jogleor < Latin joculātor joker, equivalent to joculā(rī) to joke + -tor -tor
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for jongleur

British Dictionary definitions for jongleur

jongleur
/ (French ʒɔ̃ɡlœr) /

noun

(in medieval France) an itinerant minstrel

Word Origin for jongleur

C18: from Old French jogleour, from Latin joculātor joker, jester; see juggle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012