judgment

[ juhj-muhnt ]
/ ˈdʒʌdʒ mənt /

noun


Nearby words

  1. judge-made,
  2. judges,
  3. judges' rules,
  4. judgeship,
  5. judgmatic,
  6. judgment book,
  7. judgment call,
  8. judgment day,
  9. judgment debt,
  10. judgment note

Also especially British, judge·ment.

Origin of judgment

1250–1300; Middle English jug(g)ement < Old French jugement, equivalent to juge- (stem of jugier to judge) + -ment -ment

Related formsin·ter·judg·ment, nounre·judg·ment, noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for judgment


British Dictionary definitions for judgment

judgment

judgement

/ (ˈdʒʌdʒmənt) /

noun

Judgment

/ (ˈdʒʌdʒmənt) /

noun

the estimate by God of the ultimate worthiness or unworthiness of the individual (the Particular Judgment) or of all mankind (the General Judgment or Last Judgment)
God's subsequent decision determining the final destinies of all individuals
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for judgment

judgment

n.

mid-13c., "action of trying at law, trial," also "capacity for making decisions," from Old French jugement "legal judgment; diagnosis; the Last Judgment" (11c.), from jugier (see judge (v.)). From late 13c. as "penalty imposed by a court;" early 14c. as "any authoritative decision, verdict." From c.1300 in referfence to the Last Judgment. Also from c.1300 as "opinion." Sense of "discernment" is first recorded 1530s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with judgment

judgment

see against one's better judgment; snap judgment.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.