judicial

[ joo-dish-uhl ]
/ dʒuˈdɪʃ əl /

adjective

Origin of judicial

1350–1400; Middle English < Latin jūdiciālis of the law courts, equivalent to jūdici(um) judgment (see judge, -ium) + -ālis -al1
Related forms
Can be confusedjudicial judiciary judicious (see synonym study at judicious)

Synonym study

4. See judicious.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for judicial

British Dictionary definitions for judicial

judicial

/ (dʒuːˈdɪʃəl) /

adjective

of or relating to the administration of justice
of or relating to judgment in a court of law or to a judge exercising this function
inclined to pass judgment; discriminating
allowed or enforced by a court of lawa decree of judicial separation
having qualities appropriate to a judge
giving or seeking judgment, esp determining or seeking determination of a contested issue
Derived Formsjudicially, adverb

Word Origin for judicial

C14: from Latin jūdiciālis belonging to the law courts, from jūdicium judgment, from jūdex a judge
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for judicial

judicial


adj.

late 14c., from Latin iudicalis "of or belonging to a court of justice," from iudicium "judgment, decision," from iudicem (see judge (v.)). Related: Judicially.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper