karma

[ kahr-muh ]
/ ˈkɑr mə /

noun

Hinduism, Buddhism. action, seen as bringing upon oneself inevitable results, good or bad, either in this life or in a reincarnation: in Hinduism one of the means of reaching Brahman.Compare bhakti (def. 1), jnana.
Theosophy. the cosmic principle according to which each person is rewarded or punished in one incarnation according to that person's deeds in the previous incarnation.
the good or bad emanations felt to be generated by someone or something: Lets get out of here. This place has bad karma.

VIDEO FOR KARMA

WATCH NOW: What Does The Word "Karma" Really Mean?

Let's start from the beginning—the very beginning. Karma comes from Sanskrit, an ancient Indian language going back some 3,500 years.

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Origin of karma

First recorded in 1820–30; from Sanskrit kárman- “act, deed”

OTHER WORDS FROM karma

karmic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for karma

British Dictionary definitions for karma

karma
/ (ˈkɑːmə) /

noun

Hinduism Buddhism the principle of retributive justice determining a person's state of life and the state of his reincarnations as the effect of his past deeds
theosophy the doctrine of inevitable consequence
destiny or fate

Derived forms of karma

karmic, adjective

Word Origin for karma

C19: from Sanskrit: action, effect, from karoti he does
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012