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kazoo

[kuh-zoo]
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noun, plural ka·zoos.
  1. a musical toy consisting of a tube that is open at both ends and has a hole in the side covered with parchment or membrane, which produces a buzzing sound when the performer hums into one end.Also called mirliton.
  2. Slang.
    1. the buttocks.
    2. the anus.
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Origin of kazoo

An Americanism dating back to 1880–85; origin uncertain; alleged to be imitative
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for kazoo

harmonica, harp, harmonicon, kazoo, panpipe

Examples from the Web for kazoo

Contemporary Examples of kazoo

Historical Examples of kazoo

  • The Sand Piper marched ahead, playing on a tuneful instrument known as a kazoo.

    Marjorie at Seacote

    Carolyn Wells

  • Somewhere in the bushes, someone began to play a kazoo, adding the final touch of melancholy and heartbreak to the music.

    Pagan Passions

    Gordon Randall Garrett

  • "There's a kazoo for everyone, too," said Shaw, as the outstretched hands were equipped with wedding ammunition.

    Excuse Me!

    Rupert Hughes


British Dictionary definitions for kazoo

kazoo

noun plural -zoos
  1. a cigar-shaped musical instrument of metal or plastic with a membranous diaphragm of thin paper that vibrates with a nasal sound when the player hums into it
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Word Origin for kazoo

C20: probably imitative of the sound produced
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for kazoo

n.

1884, American English, probably altered from earlier bazoo "trumpet" (1877); probably ultimately imitative (cf. bazooka). In England, formerly called a Timmy Talker, in France, a mirliton.

Kazoos, the great musical wonder, ... anyone can play it; imitates fowls, animals, bagpipes, etc. [1895 Montgomery Ward catalogue, p.245]
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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper