Idioms

Origin of track

1425–75; late Middle English trak (noun) < Middle French trac, perhaps < Old Norse trathk trodden spot; compare Norwegian trakke to trample; akin to tread

SYNONYMS FOR track

Related forms

Can be confused

tack tact track tract
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for keep track

track

/ (træk) /

noun

verb

See also tracks

Derived Forms

trackable, adjectivetracker, noun

Word Origin for track

C15: from Old French trac, probably of Germanic origin; related to Middle Dutch tracken to pull, Middle Low German trecken; compare Norwegian trakke to trample
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with keep track (1 of 2)

keep track


Remain informed, follow the course of, as in Are you keeping track of the time? This usage alludes to following a literal track, as of footsteps. The antonym, lose track, alludes to straying or wandering from a track, as in I've lost track—what day are you leaving? [Late 1800s]

Idioms and Phrases with keep track (2 of 2)

track


In addition to the idioms beginning with track

  • track down
  • track record

also see:

  • cover one's tracks
  • drop in one's tracks
  • fast track
  • follow in someone's footsteps (tracks)
  • inside track
  • jump the track
  • keep (lose) track
  • make tracks
  • off the beaten track
  • off the track
  • one-track mind
  • on the right tack (track)
  • right side of the tracks
  • stop cold (in one's tracks)
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.