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kiosk

[ kee-osk, kee-osk ]
/ ˈki ɒsk, kiˈɒsk /
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noun

a small structure having one or more sides open, used as a newsstand, refreshment stand, bandstand, etc.
a thick, columnlike structure on which notices, advertisements, etc., are posted.
an interactive computer terminal available for public use, as one with internet access or site-specific information: Students use kiosks to look up campus events.
an open pavilion or summerhouse common in Turkey and Iran.
British. a telephone booth.

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Origin of kiosk

First recorded in 1615–25; from French kiosque “stand in a public park,” ultimately from Turkish köşk “villa,” from Persian kūshk “palace, villa”

Words nearby kiosk

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

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British Dictionary definitions for kiosk

kiosk
/ (ˈkiːɒsk) /

noun

a small sometimes movable booth from which cigarettes, newspapers, light refreshments, etc, are sold
mainly British a telephone box
mainly US a thick post on which advertisements are posted
(in Turkey, Iran, etc, esp formerly) a light open-sided pavilion

Word Origin for kiosk

C17: from French kiosque bandstand, from Turkish kösk, from Persian kūshk pavilion
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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