knowing

[ noh-ing ]
/ ˈnoʊ ɪŋ /

adjective

affecting, implying, or deliberately revealing shrewd knowledge of secret or private information: a knowing glance.
that knows; having knowledge or information; intelligent.
shrewd, sharp, or astute.
conscious; intentional; deliberate.

Origin of knowing

1325–75; Middle English knawynge (earlier knowende, knawande). See know1, -ing2
Related formsknow·ing·ly, adverbknow·ing·ness, noun

Definition for knowing (2 of 2)

know

1
[ noh ]
/ noʊ /

verb (used with object), knew, known, know·ing.

verb (used without object), knew, known, know·ing.

to have knowledge or clear and certain perception, as of fact or truth.
to be cognizant or aware, as of some fact, circumstance, or occurrence; have information, as about something.

noun

the fact or state of knowing; knowledge.

Origin of know

1
before 900; Middle English knowen, knawen, Old English gecnāwan; cognate with Old High German -cnāhan, Old Norse knā to know how, be able to; akin to Latin (g)nōvī, Greek gignṓskein. See gnostic, can1
SYNONYMS FOR know
1 Know, comprehend, understand imply being aware of meanings. To know is to be aware of something as a fact or truth: He knows the basic facts of the subject. I know that he agrees with me. To comprehend is to know something thoroughly and to perceive its relationships to certain other ideas, facts, etc. To understand is to be fully aware not only of the meaning of something but also of its implications: I could comprehend all he said, but did not understand that he was joking.
Related formsknow·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for knowing

British Dictionary definitions for knowing (1 of 2)

knowing

/ (ˈnəʊɪŋ) /

adjective

suggesting secret information or knowledge
wise, shrewd, or clever
deliberate; intentional

noun

there is no knowing one cannot tell
Derived Formsknowingly, adverbknowingness, noun

British Dictionary definitions for knowing (2 of 2)

know

/ (nəʊ) /

verb knows, knowing, knew (njuː) or known (nəʊn) (mainly tr)

noun

in the know informal aware or informed
Derived Formsknowable, adjectiveknower, noun

Word Origin for know

Old English gecnāwan; related to Old Norse knā I can, Latin noscere to come to know
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with knowing

know


In addition to the idioms beginning with know

  • know all the answers
  • know a thing or two
  • know beans
  • know better
  • know by heart
  • know by sight
  • know enough to come in out of the rain
  • know from Adam
  • know if one is coming or going
  • know it all
  • know like a book
  • know one's own mind
  • know one's place
  • know one's stuff
  • know one's way around
  • know only too well
  • know the ropes
  • know the score
  • know where one stands
  • know which side of one's bread is buttered

also see:

  • before you know it
  • (know) by heart
  • come in out of the rain, know enough to
  • coming or going, know if one's
  • for all (I know)
  • god knows
  • (know) inside out
  • in the know
  • it takes one to know one
  • left hand doesn't know what right hand is doing
  • not know beans
  • not know from Adam
  • not know where to turn
  • not know which way to jump
  • thing or two, know
  • what do you know
  • what have you (who knows what)
  • which is which, know
  • you know
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.