Kymry

[ kim-ree ]
/ ˈkɪm ri /

plural noun

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Definition for kymry (2 of 2)

Cymry

or Kym·ry

[ kim-ree ]
/ ˈkɪm ri /

noun (used with a plural verb)

the Welsh, or the branch of the Celtic people to which the Welsh belong, comprising also the Cornish people and the Bretons.

Origin of Cymry

< Welsh Cymry Welshmen, plural of Cymro < British Celtic *combrogos, presumably “fellow countryman,” equivalent to *com- (cognate with Latin com- com-) + *-brogos, derivative of *brogā > Welsh, Cornish, Breton bro country, district; compare Allobrogēs a Gaulish tribe, Old Irish mruig piece of inhabited or cultivated land
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for kymry

  • And none have any title therein but the nation of the Kymry.

    Archaic England|Harold Bayley
  • But behind the Kymry, as likewise admittedly behind the Cretans, are the traces of an even more primitive and archaic race.

    Archaic England|Harold Bayley
  • Having freed himself from the Scots in the north, thelfrith turned upon the Kymry.

British Dictionary definitions for kymry (1 of 2)

Kymry
/ (ˈkɪmrɪ) /

pl n

a variant spelling of Cymry

British Dictionary definitions for kymry (2 of 2)

Cymry

Kymry

/ (ˈkɪmrɪ) /

noun the Cymry (functioning as plural)

the Brythonic branch of the Celtic people, comprising the present-day Welsh, Cornish, and BretonsSee Brythonic
the Welsh people

Word Origin for Cymry

Welsh: the Welsh
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012