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labile

[ ley-bahyl, -buhl ]
/ ˈleɪ baɪl, -bəl /
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adjective
apt or likely to change: the labile nature of language.
(in chemistry, biology, psychology, etc.) able or likely to change or break down easily, rapidly, or continually; unstable: labile emotions;labile blood pressure;cellular functions that seem to require different levels of labile zinc.
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Origin of labile

First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English labil “(of the mind) wandering, forgetful,” from Latin lābilis “sliding, slipping, (of verse) smooth-flowing,” equivalent to Latin lāb(ī) “to slip” + -ilis -ile

OTHER WORDS FROM labile

la·bil·i·ty [luh-bil-i-tee, ley-], /ləˈbɪl ɪ ti, leɪ-/, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use labile in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for labile

labile
/ (ˈleɪbɪl) /

adjective
chem (of a compound) prone to chemical change
liable to change or move

Derived forms of labile

lability (ləˈbɪlɪtɪ), noun

Word Origin for labile

C15: via Late Latin lābilis, from Latin lābī to slide, slip
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for labile

labile
[ lābīl′, -bəl ]

adj.
Receptive to change; adaptable.
Constantly undergoing or likely to undergo change, as a chemical compound; unstable.

Other words from labile

la•bili•ty (-bĭlĭ-tē) n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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