lace

[ leys ]
/ leɪs /

noun

verb (used with object), laced, lac·ing.

verb (used without object), laced, lac·ing.

to be fastened with a lace: These shoes lace up the side.
to attack physically or verbally (often followed by into): The teacher laced into his students.

Origin of lace

1175–1225; (noun) Middle English las < Old French laz, lasLatin laqueus noose; (v.) Middle English lasen < Middle French lacier, lasser, lachier (French lacer) ≪ Latin laqueāre to enclose in a noose, trap

Related forms

lace·like, adjectivelac·er, nounre·lace, verb, re·laced, re·lac·ing.well-laced, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for lace into (1 of 2)

lace into


verb

(intr, preposition) to attack violently, either verbally or physically

British Dictionary definitions for lace into (2 of 2)

lace

/ (leɪs) /

noun

verb

See also lace into, lace up

Derived Forms

lacelike, adjectivelacer, noun

Word Origin for lace

C13 las, from Old French laz, from Latin laqueus noose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with lace into

lace into


Also, light into. Attack, assail, as in He laced into me for arriving late, or She lit into him for forgetting the tickets. The first of these colloquial terms employs lace in the sense of “beat up or thrash,” a usage dating from the late 1500s. The idiom with light dates from the late 1800s and stems from the verb meaning “descend.”

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.