lash

1
[ lash ]
/ læʃ /

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

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weal

Origin of lash

1
1300–50; Middle English lashe (noun), lashen (v.); perhaps of expressive orig.

OTHER WORDS FROM lash

lash·er, nounlash·ing·ly, adverblash·less, adjective

Definition for lash (2 of 3)

lash2
[ lash ]
/ læʃ /

verb (used with object)

to bind or fasten with a rope, cord, or the like.

Origin of lash

2
1400–50; late Middle English lasschyn, probably < Middle Dutch or Low German; compare Middle Dutch lasche patch, gusset, Dutch laschen to patch, scarf

OTHER WORDS FROM lash

lash·er, nounlash·ing·ly, adverb

Definition for lash (3 of 3)

LASH
[ lash ]
/ læʃ /

noun

an ocean-going vessel equipped with special cranes and holds for lifting and stowing cargo-carrying barges that can be sailed up inland waterways or into port facilities from offshore.

Origin of LASH

1960–65; l(ighter) a(board) sh(ip)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for lash

British Dictionary definitions for lash (1 of 2)

lash1
/ (læʃ) /

noun

verb (tr)

See also lash out

Derived forms of lash

lasher, nounlashingly, adverb

Word Origin for lash

C14: perhaps imitative

British Dictionary definitions for lash (2 of 2)

lash2
/ (læʃ) /

verb

(tr) to bind or secure with rope, string, etc

Derived forms of lash

lasher, noun

Word Origin for lash

C15: from Old French lachier, ultimately from Latin laqueāre to ensnare, from laqueus noose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012