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layover

[ ley-oh-ver ]
/ ˈleɪˌoʊ vər /
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noun

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“Evoke” and “invoke” both derive from the same Latin root “vocāre.”

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Origin of layover

1870–75, Americanism; noun use of verb phrase lay over
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use layover in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for layover

lay over
/ US and Canadian /

verb (adverb)

(tr) to postpone for future action
(intr) to make a temporary stop in a journey

noun layover

a break in a journey, esp in waiting for a connection
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with layover

lay over

1

Postpone, as in This issue will have to be laid over until our next meeting. [Late 1800s]

2

Make a stop in the course of a journey, as in They had to lay over for two days in New Delhi until the next flight to Katmandu. This sense gave rise to the noun lay-over for such a stopover. [Late 1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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