let-out

[ adjective let-out; noun let-out ]
/ adjective ˈlɛtˈaʊt; noun ˈlɛtˌaʊt /

adjective

(of fur) processed by cutting parallel diagonal slashes into the pelt and sewing the slashed edges together to lengthen the pelt and to improve the appearance of the fur.

noun

Chiefly British. a means of escape; loophole.

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Origin of let-out

First recorded in 1830–40; adj., noun use of verb phrase let out

Definition for let out (2 of 2)

Origin of let

1
before 900; Middle English leten, Old English lǣtan; cognate with Dutch laten, German lassen, Old Norse lāta, Gothic lētan; akin to Greek lēdeîn to be weary, Latin lassus tired. See late

synonym study for let

1. See allow.

usage note for let

Let us is used in all varieties of speech and writing to introduce a suggestion or a request: Let us consider all the facts before deciding. The contracted form let's occurs mostly in informal speech and writing: Let's go. Let's not think about that right now. Perhaps because let's has come to be felt as a word in its own right rather than as the contraction of let us, it is often followed in informal speech and writing by redundant or appositional pronouns: Let's us plan a picnic. Let's you and I (or me ) get together tomorrow. Both Let's you and me and Let's you and I occur in the relaxed speech of educated speakers. The former conforms to the traditional rules of grammar; the latter, nonetheless, occurs more frequently. See also leave1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for let out (1 of 3)

let out

verb (adverb, mainly tr)

noun let-out

a chance to escape

British Dictionary definitions for let out (2 of 3)

let1
/ (lɛt) /

verb lets, letting or let (tr; usually takes an infinitive without to or an implied infinitive)

noun

British the act of letting property or accommodationthe majority of new lets are covered by the rent regulations

Word Origin for let

Old English lǣtan to permit; related to Gothic lētan, German lassen

British Dictionary definitions for let out (3 of 3)

let2
/ (lɛt) /

noun

an impediment or obstruction (esp in the phrase without let or hindrance)
tennis squash
  1. a minor infringement or obstruction of the ball, requiring a point to be replayed
  2. the point so replayed

verb lets, letting, letted or let

(tr) archaic to hinder; impede

Word Origin for let

Old English lettan to hinder, from læt late; related to Old Norse letja
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with let out (1 of 2)

let out

1

Allow to get out; also see get out of.

2

Make known, reveal, as in I thought it was a secret—who let it out? [First half of 1800s] Also see let the cat out of the bag.

3

Come to a close, end, as in What time does school let out? [Late 1800s]

4

Increase the size of a garment, as in May's coat needs to be let out across the shoulders. This usage refers to opening some of the seams. [Late 1700s]

Idioms and Phrases with let out (2 of 2)

let

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.