liman

[li-mahn, -man]
noun Geology.
  1. a muddy lagoon, marsh, or lake near the mouth of a river behind part of the delta and more or less protected from open water by a barrier or spit.
  2. an area of mud or silt deposited near the mouth of a river.

Origin of liman

1855–60; < Russian limán estuary, coastal salt lake < Turkish or Crimean Tatar < Medieval Greek liménion, liménas (compare Greek limḗn harbor)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for liman

Contemporary Examples of liman

  • The current cycle of strong women on TV, Liman says, may have a certain Secretary of State to thank.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Action Heroes in Heels

    Shannon Donnelly

    August 23, 2010

  • Liman, meanwhile, sees it as a rejection of the precedent of the way women have often been portrayed in media.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Action Heroes in Heels

    Shannon Donnelly

    August 23, 2010

Historical Examples of liman

  • I reckon our landlady has a bigger brain than Enver and Liman.

    Greenmantle

    John Buchan

  • Arriving at dawn they, too, found the town asleep, and clattered through the streets in search of Liman von Sanders.

  • On the morning of Oct. 14, the fleet weighed and stood along shore towards the Liman of the Dnieper.

  • Casper and Liman approach the subject with almost equal disgust, but with more regard for scientific truth than Tardieu.

    A Problem in Modern Ethics

    John Addington Symonds

  • Having criticised Tardieu for his use of the phrase pderast, Casper and Liman can find no better.

    A Problem in Modern Ethics

    John Addington Symonds