linstock

[ lin-stok ]

noun
  1. a staff with one end forked to hold a match, formerly used in firing cannon.

Origin of linstock

1
1565–75; earlier lyntstock<Dutch lontstock match-stick, with lint replacing lont by association with the material commonly used as tinder

Words Nearby linstock

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use linstock in a sentence

  • A tall artillerist stood, with linstock and fuse, near the breech, waiting for the order to fire.

    The Rifle Rangers | Captain Mayne Reid
  • The gallant gunners, linstock in hand, watched by the guns loaded with bags of bullets and with chain shot.

  • Another suggestion connects it with a supposed derivation of “linstock,” from “lint.”

  • Wat Kilby, whose eyes had been fixed on Janet staring out of the window, uttered a low growl, and lit the linstock.

    Sweet Mace | George Manville Fenn
  • linstock in hand the brawny gunner on the poop stood ready to answer them when the word should be given.

    The Sea-Hawk | Raphael Sabatini

British Dictionary definitions for linstock

linstock

/ (ˈlɪnˌstɒk) /


noun
  1. a long staff holding a lighted match, formerly used to fire a cannon

Origin of linstock

1
C16: from Dutch lontstok, from lont match + stok stick

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012