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literati

[ lit-uh-rah-tee ]
/ ˌlɪt əˈrɑ ti /
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plural noun, singular lit·e·ra·tus [lit-uh-rah-tuhs, ‐rey‐]. /ˌlɪt əˈrɑ təs, ‐ˈreɪ‐/.

people engaged in literary pursuits, especially professional writers: The lounge at the Algonquin Hotel in New York City was a well-known haunt of the literati during the 1920s.
learned people and scholars considered as a class:university literati in their ivory tower.

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Origin of literati

First recorded in 1615–25; from Latin līterāti, litterāti “learned, liberally educated people,” noun use of plural of līterātus, litterātus; see origin at literate
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

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British Dictionary definitions for literati

literati
/ (ˌlɪtəˈrɑːtiː) /

pl n

literary or scholarly people

Word Origin for literati

C17: from Latin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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