loot

1
[loot]
||

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to take loot; plunder: The conquerors looted and robbed.

Origin of loot

1
1780–90; < Hindi lūṭ, akin to Sanskrit luṇṭhati (he) steals
Related formsloot·er, noun

Synonyms for loot

1. booty. 7. sack, ransack.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for looter

Contemporary Examples of looter

Historical Examples of looter

  • Dworn didn't linger to learn its reaction at spying a looter.

    World of the Drone

    Robert Abernathy

  • It's barely possible some looter may be prowling in the house.

    The Hosts of the Air

    Joseph A. Altsheler

  • The looter goes in for himself alone without considerin' his organization or his city.

    Plunkitt of Tammany Hall

    George Washington Plunkitt

  • A strong military line was then drawn around the district, and this last resource of the looter came to an end.

  • During the Civil War the word acquired the special meaning of looter.

    The American Language

    Henry L. Mencken


British Dictionary definitions for looter

loot

noun

goods stolen during pillaging, as in wartime, during riots, etc
goods, money, etc, obtained illegally
informal money or wealth
the act of looting or plundering

verb

to pillage (a city, settlement, etc) during war or riots
to steal (money or goods), esp during pillaging
Derived Formslooter, noun

Word Origin for loot

C19: from Hindi lūt
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for looter
n.

1858, agent noun from loot (v.).

loot

n.

"goods taken from an enemy, etc.," 1788, Anglo-Indian, from Hindi lut, from Sanskrit loptram, lotram "booty, stolen property," from PIE *roup-tro-, from root *reup- "to snatch" (see rip (v.)). The verb is first attested 1821, from the noun. Related: Looted; looting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper