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lore

1
[ lawr, lohr ]
/ lɔr, loʊr /
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noun
the body of knowledge, especially of a traditional, anecdotal, or popular nature, on a particular subject: the lore of herbs.
learning, knowledge, or erudition.
Archaic.
  1. the process or act of teaching; instruction.
  2. something that is taught; lesson.
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Origin of lore

1
First recorded before 950; Middle English; Old English lār; cognate with Dutch leer, German Lehre “teaching”; see origin at learn

synonym study for lore

1. See learning.

OTHER WORDS FROM lore

loreless, adjective

Other definitions for lore (2 of 2)

lore2
[ lawr, lohr ]
/ lɔr, loʊr /

noun Zoology.
the space between the eye and the bill of a bird, or a corresponding space in other animals, as snakes.

Origin of lore

2
1615–25; <New Latin lōrum, special use of Latin lōrum thong, strap
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use lore in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for lore (1 of 2)

lore1
/ (lɔː) /

noun
collective knowledge or wisdom on a particular subject, esp of a traditional nature
knowledge or learning
archaic teaching, or something that is taught

Word Origin for lore

Old English lār; related to leornian to learn

British Dictionary definitions for lore (2 of 2)

lore2
/ (lɔː) /

noun
the surface of the head of a bird between the eyes and the base of the bill
the corresponding area in a snake or fish

Word Origin for lore

C19: from New Latin lōrum, from Latin: strap
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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