tradition

[ truh-dish-uhn ]
/ trəˈdɪʃ ən /

noun

Origin of tradition

1350–1400; Middle English tradicion < Old French < Latin trāditiōn- (stem of trāditiō) a handing over or down, transfer, equivalent to trādit(us), past participle of trādere to give over, impart, surrender, betray (trā-, variant of trāns- trans- + -ditus, combining form of datus given; see date1) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for tradition

British Dictionary definitions for tradition

tradition

/ (trəˈdɪʃən) /

noun

Derived Formstraditionless, adjectivetraditionist, noun

Word Origin for tradition

C14: from Latin trāditiō a handing down, surrender, from trādere to give up, transmit, from trans- + dāre to give
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tradition

tradition


n.

late 14c., from Old French tradicion (late 13c.), from Latin traditionem (nominative traditio) "delivery, surrender, a handing down," from traditus, past participle of tradere "deliver, hand over," from trans- "over" (see trans-) + dare "to give" (see date (n.1)). The word is a doublet of treason (q.v.). The notion in the modern sense of the word is of things "handed down" from generation to generation.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper