louver

[ loo-ver ]
/ ˈlu vər /

noun

any of a series of narrow openings framed at their longer edges with slanting, overlapping fins or slats, adjustable for admitting light and air while shutting out rain.
a fin or slat framing such an opening.
a ventilating turret or lantern, as on the roof of a medieval building.
any of a system of slits formed in the hood of an automobile, the door of a metal locker, etc., used especially for ventilation.
a door, window, or the like, having adjustable louvers.

verb (used with object)

to make a louver in; add louvers to: to louver a door.

QUIZZES

DISCOVER THE INFLUENCE OF PORTUGUESE ON ENGLISH VIA THIS QUIZ!

We’ve gathered some interesting words donated to English from Portuguese … as well as some that just don’t translate at all. Do you know what they mean?
Question 1 of 11
Which of the following animal names traces its immediate origin to Portuguese?
Also especially British, lou·vre .

Origin of louver

1325–75; Middle English lover<Middle French lovier<Middle Dutch love gallery. See lobby

OTHER WORDS FROM louver

louvered, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH louver

louver , Louvre, lover
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for louver

  • The fire of pine logs was in the midst of the hall, and the smoke went out through a louver in the roof.

  • By good luck, we did not need it; for as he passed it to me, the louver at which I was tugging broke and came away in my hand.

    The Adventures of Harry Revel|Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch