lunch

[luhnch]
See more synonyms for lunch on Thesaurus.com
verb (used without object)
  1. to eat lunch: We lunched quite late today.
verb (used with object)
  1. to provide lunch for: They lunched us in regal fashion.
Idioms
  1. out to lunch, Slang. not paying attention or tending to business; negligent: You must have been out to lunch when you wrote that weird report.

Origin of lunch

First recorded in 1585–95; short for luncheon
Related formslunch·er, nounlunch·less, adjectivepre·lunch, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for lunch

luncheon, snack, tea

Examples from the Web for lunch

Contemporary Examples of lunch

Historical Examples of lunch

  • "They needn't eat their lunch that way," declared his sister.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • And so she sat quietly eating her lunch, and talking with us.

  • When Viviette came down for lunch, she found Dick awaiting her in the hall.

    Viviette

    William J. Locke

  • Next he went all the way, was asked to go in, and invited to stay to lunch.

    Weighed and Wanting

    George MacDonald

  • Come in the morning if you want, and we'll take a lunch and go for the day.

    Her Father's Daughter

    Gene Stratton-Porter


British Dictionary definitions for lunch

lunch

noun
  1. a meal eaten during the middle of the day
  2. Caribbean (among older people) mid-afternoon tea
verb
  1. (intr) to eat lunch
  2. (tr) to provide or buy lunch for
Derived Formsluncher, noun

Word Origin for lunch

C16: probably short form of luncheon
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for lunch
n.

"mid-day repast," 1786, shortened form of luncheon (q.v.). The verb meaning "to take to lunch" (said to be from the noun) also is attested from 1786:

PRATTLE. I always to be ſure, makes a point to keep up the dignity of the family I lives in. Wou'd you take a more ſolid refreſhment?--Have you lunch'd, Mr. Bribe?

BRIBE. Lunch'd O dear! Permit me, my dear Mrs. Prattle, to refreſh my sponge, upon the honey dew that clings to your raviſhing pouters. O! Mrs. Prattle, this ſhall be my lunch. (kiſſes)

["The Mode," in William Davies' "Plays Written for a Private Theatre," London, 1786]

But as late as 1817 the only definition of lunch in Webster's is "a large piece of food." OED says in 1820s the word "was regarded either as a vulgarism, or as a fashionable affectation." Related: Lunched; lunching. Lunch money is attested from 1868; lunch-time (n.) is from 1821; lunch hour is from 1840. Slang phrase out to lunch "insane, stupid, clueless" first recorded 1955, on notion of being "not there." Old English had nonmete "afternoon meal," literally "noon-meat."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with lunch

lunch

see eat someone alive (someone's lunch); free lunch; lose one's lunch; out to (lunch).

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.