lute

1
[ loot ]
/ lut /

noun

a stringed musical instrument having a long, fretted neck and a hollow, typically pear-shaped body with a vaulted back.

verb (used without object), lut·ed, lut·ing.

to play a lute.

verb (used with object), lut·ed, lut·ing.

to perform (music) on a lute: a musician skilled at luting Elizabethan ballads.
to express (a feeling, mood, etc.) by means of a lute: The minstrel eloquently luted his melancholy.

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Origin of lute

1
1325–75; Middle English <Middle French, Old French <Old Provençal laut<Arabic al ʿūd literally, the wood

Definition for lute (2 of 3)

lute2
[ loot ]
/ lut /

noun

verb (used with object), lut·ed, lut·ing.

to seal or cement with luting.

Origin of lute

2
1375–1425; late Middle English <Medieval Latin lutum, special use of Latin lutum mud, clay

Definition for lute (3 of 3)

lute3
[ loot ]
/ lut /

noun

a paving tool for spreading and smoothing concrete, consisting of a straightedge mounted transversely on a long handle.

verb (used with object), lut·ed, lut·ing.

to spread and smooth (concrete in a pavement) with a lute.

Origin of lute

3
1870–75, Americanism;<Dutch loet
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for lute

British Dictionary definitions for lute (1 of 2)

lute1
/ (luːt) /

noun

an ancient plucked stringed instrument, consisting of a long fingerboard with frets and gut strings, and a body shaped like a sliced pear

Word Origin for lute

C14: from Old French lut, via Old Provençal from Arabic al `ūd, literally: the wood

British Dictionary definitions for lute (2 of 2)

lute2
/ (luːt) /

noun

Also called: luting a mixture of cement and clay used to seal the joints between pipes, etc
dentistry a thin layer of cement used to fix a crown or inlay in place on a tooth

verb

(tr) to seal (a joint or surface) with lute

Word Origin for lute

C14: via Old French ultimately from Latin lutum clay
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012