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Lützen

[ ly-tsuhn ]

noun

  1. a town in E Germany, WSW of Leipzig: site of Gustavus Adolphus' victory over Wallenstein in 1632 and Napoleon's victory over the Russians in 1813.


Lützen

/ ˈlytsən /

noun

  1. a town near Leipzig in E Germany, in Saxony; site of a battle (1632) in the Thirty Years' War in which the army of the Holy Roman Empire under Wallenstein was defeated by the Swedes under Gustavus Adolphus, who died in the battle


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Example Sentences

Near Lutzen fell the thunder that had menaced Nuremberg; the victory, half lost, was purchased by the death of the king.

The strained expectation of Europe, so disappointed before Nuremberg, was now to be gratified on the plains of Lutzen.

The order which recalled that general to Lutzen had reached him in Halle, while his troops were still plundering the town.

The order which recalled that general to Lutzen had reached him in Halle, while his troops were still plundering that town.

The battle of Lutzen was fought on the 16th of November, 1632.

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LutzLützow-Holm Bay