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lyricism

[ lir-uh-siz-uhm ]

noun

  1. lyric character or style, as in poetry.
  2. lyric feeling; enthusiasm, especially when unrestrained or exaggerated.


lyricism

/ ˈlɪrɪˌsɪzəm /

noun

  1. the quality or style of lyric poetry
  2. emotional or enthusiastic outpouring


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Other Words From

  • non·lyri·cism noun
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Word History and Origins

Origin of lyricism1

First recorded in 1750–60; lyric + -ism
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Example Sentences

Her lyricism is saturated with optimism devoid of naivete, particularly on her new album “Love Transcends,” a finger-wagging celebration of being alive, despite it all.

The lines blur between songs and poetry in much of Ball’s work, from the rhythm bouncing off the page to the lyricism of Tank and the Bangas’s songs.

That said, director Laley Lippard and her cast succeed in capitalizing on the play’s poignancy and lyricism, as well as all that aptness.

Cantonese, with its individual characters, also forces rappers to adopt a staccato lyricism.

His music bled menace and lust, but also tenderness and vulnerability and an overpowering romantic lyricism.

For sheer lyricism, that single shot is hard to beat—a one-man answer to the home-foreclosures crisis.

Lyricism in France is a new faculty; I believe that the education of the Jesuits has been a considerable misfortune to letters.

His descriptive lyricism, instead of imparting a grandeur to his subject, diminishes it; instead of refining it, renders it petty.

Phrases of an apparent intensity and lyricism are negated by frivolous and tinkling passage-work.

But the fact remains that there is no such thing as dramatic poetry, for the essence of all poetry is its lyricism.

With a lyricism that is as convincing as it is authentic, you feel that there is a certain underlying spirit of resignation.

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lyricallyricist