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View synonyms for maestro

maestro

[ mahy-stroh ]

noun

, plural maes·tros.
  1. an eminent composer, teacher, or conductor of music:

    Toscanini and other great maestros.

  2. (initial capital letter) a title of respect used in addressing or referring to such a person.
  3. a master of any art:

    the maestros of poetry.



maestro

/ ˈmaɪstrəʊ /

noun

  1. a distinguished music teacher, conductor, or musician
  2. any man regarded as the master of an art: often used as a term of address


maestro

  1. A title for distinguished artists, especially those in music. It may be given to teachers, composers, conductors, or performers. Maestro is Italian for “master.”


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Word History and Origins

Origin of maestro1

1790–1800; < Italian: master
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Word History and Origins

Origin of maestro1

C18: Italian: master
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Example Sentences

Federer — so often likened to a maestro, a painter, a ballet dancer — can make the game look artfully effortless, such is his uncommon fast-twitch grace.

Levine, who died earlier this month at age 77, was the symbol for maestro.

The maestro managed to return to the NSO podium a few times toward the end of that month, salvaging some of the repertoire they had prepped for Asia with a pair of concerts featuring guest violinist Akiko Suwanai.

Although humans are hardly smelling maestros in the animal kingdom, we can nevertheless detect roughly one trillion odors, often with only a single scent molecule drifting into our noses.

If anything, given the close call with the playoffs last season, the franchise’s decision to stand pat confirms its trust in its maestro to run the show.

Wyclef Jean, the 45-year-old music maestro, has dabbled in many things.

But all that ass-shaking as part of the showpersonship—mm, one could guess what the gospel maestro might be muttering.

The next “story” as the novelist William Kennedy, another maestro, would say.

She told me he insisted she called him Maestro: “I thought it was ridiculous and silly,” she said.

At the opening, Clinton was very much the maestro, a mixture of MC and talk show host.

Further, the fittings for them had to be made presumably on the premises of the maestro and not as at present in foreign parts.

The maestro was not so enthusiastic as Messiani, but he promised to do what he could.

This artist was the son of Maestro Cione, a goldsmith of Florence.

Why, to the manager, I suppose; the maestro—the man who holds the gambling concession in this place.

The prodigious stimulus of such a teacher (cotanto maestro) made the reading a real labor of love.

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Maestrichtmaestro di cappella