Dictionary.com

magnet

[ mag-nit ]
/ ˈmæg nɪt /
Save This Word!

noun

a body, as a piece of iron or steel, that possesses the property of attracting certain substances, as iron.
a lodestone.
a thing or person that attracts: The park was a magnet for pickpockets and muggers.

QUIZZES

QUIZ YOURSELF ON “ITS” VS. “IT’S”!

Apostrophes can be tricky; prove you know the difference between it’s and its in this crafty quiz!
Question 1 of 12
On the farm, the feed for chicks is significantly different from the roosters’; ______ not even comparable.

Origin of magnet

1400–50; late Middle English magnete<Latin magnēta<Greek mágnēta, accusative of mágnēs, short for () Mágnēs (líthos) (the stone) of Magnesia
coun·ter·mag·net, noun
magnate, magnet

Definition for magnet (2 of 2)

magnet-

variant of magneto- before some vowels: magneton.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for magnet

magnet
/ (ˈmæɡnɪt) /

noun

a body that can attract certain substances, such as iron or steel, as a result of a magnetic field; a piece of ferromagnetic substanceSee also electromagnet
a person or thing that exerts a great attraction
C15: via Latin from Greek magnēs, shortened from ho Magnēs lithos the Magnesian stone. See magnesia
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for magnet

magnet
[ măgnĭt ]

A material or object that produces a magnetic field. Lodestones are natural magnets, though many materials, especially metals, can be made into magnets by exposing them to a magnetic field. See also electromagnet ferromagnetism magnetic pole. See Note at magnetism.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Cultural definitions for magnet

magnet

An object that attracts iron and some other materials. Magnets are said to generate a magnetic field around themselves. Every magnet has two poles, called the north and south poles. Magnetic poles exert forces on each other in such a way that like poles repel and unlike poles attract each other. A compass is a small magnet that is affected by the magnetic field of the Earth in such a way that it points to a magnetic pole of the Earth. (See magnetic field and magnetism.)

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Get Online Help For Kids!