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manger

[ meyn-jer ]
/ ˈmeɪn dʒər /
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noun

a box or trough in a stable or barn from which horses or cattle eat.
Nautical.
  1. a space at the bow of a ship, having a partition for confining water entering at the hawseholes until it can be drained.
  2. a sunken bottom in a chain locker, covered by a grating and used to collect water from the anchor chain.

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Origin of manger

1350–1400; Middle English <Middle French maingeure, derivative of mangier to eat <Latin mandūcāre to chew, eat. See manducate

Definition for manger (2 of 2)

Manger
[ meyn-jer ]
/ ˈmeɪn dʒər /

noun Astronomy.

Origin of Manger

1545–55; as translation of Latin praesēpe
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for manger

British Dictionary definitions for manger

manger
/ (ˈmeɪndʒə) /

noun

a trough or box in a stable, barn, etc, from which horses or cattle feed
nautical a basin-like construction in the bows of a vessel for catching water draining from an anchor rode or coming in through the hawseholes

Word Origin for manger

C14: from Old French maingeure food trough, from mangier to eat, ultimately from Latin mandūcāre to chew
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with manger

manger

see dog in the manger.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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