Marshalsea

[ mahr-shuhl-see ]

nounBritish History.
  1. the court of the marshal of the royal household.

  2. a debtors' prison in London, abolished in 1842.

Origin of Marshalsea

1
1350–1400; Middle English marchalsye, variant of marschalcie.See marshal, -cy

Words Nearby Marshalsea

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use Marshalsea in a sentence

  • The condemned felon has as good a yard for air and exercise in Newgate, as the insolvent debtor in the Marshalsea Prison.

    The Pickwick Papers | Charles Dickens
  • The shabby old debtor with the soft manners and the white hair became the Father of the Marshalsea.

    The World's Greatest Books, Vol III | Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.
  • The next day the debtor's wife came to the Marshalsea, bringing with her a little boy of three, and a little girl of two.

    The World's Greatest Books, Vol III | Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.
  • The Child of the Marshalsea learned needlework of an insolvent milliner, and went out daily to work for a Mrs. Clennam.

    The World's Greatest Books, Vol III | Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.
  • Little as she had always looked, she looked less than ever when he saw her going into the Marshalsea Lodge passage.

    The World's Greatest Books, Vol III | Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.

British Dictionary definitions for Marshalsea

Marshalsea

/ (ˈmɑːʃəlˌsiː) /


noun
  1. (formerly in England) a court held before the knight marshal: abolished 1849

  2. a prison for debtors and others, situated in Southwark, London: abolished in 1842

Origin of Marshalsea

1
C14: see marshal, -cy

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012