matter-of-fact

[ mat-er-uh v-fakt ]
/ ˈmæt ər əvˈfækt /

adjective

adhering strictly to fact; not imaginative; prosaic; dry; commonplace: a matter-of-fact account of the political rally.
direct or unemotional; straightforward; down-to-earth.

Origin of matter-of-fact

First recorded in 1705–15

Related forms

mat·ter-of-fact·ly, adverbmat·ter-of-fact·ness, noun

Definition for matter-of-fact (2 of 2)

matter of fact


noun

something of a factual nature, as an actual occurrence.
Law. a statement or allegation to be judged on the basis of the evidence.

Origin of matter of fact

First recorded in 1575–85
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for matter-of-fact

British Dictionary definitions for matter-of-fact

matter of fact


noun

a fact that is undeniably true
law a statement of facts the truth of which the court must determine on the basis of the evidence before itCompare matter of law
philosophy a proposition that is amenable to empirical testing, as contrasted with the truths of logic or mathematics
as a matter of fact actually; in fact

adjective matter-of-fact

unimaginative or emotionlesshe gave a matter-of-fact account of the murder
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012